Authentic Gazpacho Recipe

There’s something about hot weather that makes me think of this gazpacho recipe. When I was living in Carmona, the summers were hot!

The temperatures would easily reach 40 degrees Celsius, which is about 105 degrees. Electricity can be very expensive there, and it’s costly to run the A/C all day long.

The options to stay cool were to go elsewhere to work for a couple of hours or stay at home. Workouts had to get done early in the morning and forget about cooking.

Well, I find myself in a similar situation in Pennsylvania.

As I write this, we’re in the middle of a heatwave. It’s about 96 degrees out today. The difference between here and other places is that there is a ton of humidity. I forgot about that!

So, that being said, I’m not cooking at all. The oven is off, and the TV is too. It adds a couple of degrees to my tiny apartment, which I don’t want right now.

It reminds me of what I’d eat when I was living in Carmona. I’d pick up a carton of Gazpacho Andaluz. It was gazpacho that you’d buy in milk cartons, that you just pour out into a glass or a bowl.

It made for a great lunch because it was cool and refreshing. It was also surprisingly filling. It’s also common for appetites to diminish while the temperatures climb into the 90s and 100s.

I don’t have that kind of luxury here in Pennsylvania. Fortunately, this easy gazpacho recipe can give you a great gazpacho from Spain in just a few minutes.

Read on to learn how to make authentic gazpacho from Spain.

Gazpacho History

Much like the history of southern Spain and the architecture of the region, you’ll find a rich history full of influences.

To give you a hint about the history of gazpacho, you should know the origins of the word. It is derived from Arabic, and it means soaked bread.

The roots of the dish were brought to the region from the Greeks and the Romans. They had a tradition of pulverizing food, which was used to feel hungry Roman soldiers that would have olive oil, bread, vinegar, and garlic with them.  They’d make a paste and dip the bread into it.

The gazpacho that we know of today came about after tomatoes and peppers made their way to the region from the New World in the 16th century.

Ingredients (Ingredientes)

So, since this is an authentic Spanish recipe, I thought that I’d give you a simple Spanish lesson as I describe the ingredients.

Insert picture of ingredients

Here’s what you need to make authentic gazpacho Andaluz:

  • Tomate
  • Cebolla
  • Pepino
  • Piminento Verde
  • Pan
  • Ajo
  • Cucharada Vinagre de Jerez
  • Aceite de oliva
  • Sal & Pimiento
gazpacho recipe ingredients

How much of that did you understand? You probably surprised yourself with what you already know. If you’re filling in some of the words, here are the ingredients in English:

  • Tomatoes
  • Onion
  • Cucumber
  • Green bell pepper
  • Bread
  • Garlic
  • A teaspoon of sherry vinegar
  • Olive oil

You wash the vegetables, cut them into chunks, throw everything in the blender, and that’s it. I use a batidora de mano (hand blender), so I put the ingredients in a pitcher and blend everything up.

pitcher of cut up vegetables for gazpacho

If you want detailed instructions on how to make traditional gazpacho, you’ll want to see this video. You’ll learn a little bit of Spanish along the way.

Is gazpacho healthy? Yes it is, even with bread. You can get a full course of vegetables and healthy fats while enjoying the refreshing dish.

Gazpacho Tips

What kind of tomatoes should you use? It doesn’t matter as long as they’re ripe. With this recipe, it’s best to keep it simple. You don’t need to peel or seed the tomatoes.

You can use a standing blender or a hand blender to make the dish. Either one will work just fine. When I first tried to make gazpacho with the hand blender, I used a mixing bowl, which didn’t quite work.

pitcher of gazpacho with bread and hand mixer

The next time, I tried to use a pitcher. That worked out much better and it gave me more leverage with the hand mixer.

Does it matter what kind of bread you use? I use French bread because it’s easier to break into chunks and add it to the mix. You can try this with wheat, sourdough, or rye if you’re feeling adventurous. It will impact the flavor of the final product, and not in a good way. Proceed with caution. You can do it if that’s all the bread you have in the house.

You can make this without bread if you want a gluten-free option. It won’t be authentic gazpacho Andaluz, but it will still be tasty.

Authentic Gazpacho Recipe

This recipe is direct from the swelting summers in Sevilla. Try out this authentic Gazpacho Andaluz recipe that's perfect for the hottest days.
Prep Time10 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Main Course, Snack, Soup
Cuisine: Mediterranean, Spanish
Keyword: Authentic Gazpacho, Gazpacho, Gazpacho Andaluz, Traditional Gazpacho
Servings: 2
Calories: 487kcal
Author: Heather McDaniel

Equipment

  • Hand Blender
  • Blender

Ingredients

  • 2 Tomatoes
  • 1 Red Bell Pepper
  • 1 Green Bell Pepper
  • 1 Onion
  • 1 Cucumber
  • 1 Clove of Garlic
  • 4 oz Day-old bread
  • 1/4 C Olive Oil
  • 3 Tbs Sherry Vinegar
  • Salt and Pepper To taste

Instructions

  • Cut up vegetables into chunks.
  • Put the vegetables in a blender or a pitcher.
  • Add olive oil and vinegar.
  • Blend using a blender or hand blender until vegetables are mostly smooth.
  • Add bread.
  • Blend again until you have a smooth soup.
  • Add a little salt and pepper to taste.
  • Serve cold in a small glass or bowl.

Notes

Keep in mind that this won’t be a 100% smooth soup like a roasted butternut squash or carrot soup. Small pieces of cucumber and pepper will be visible. That’s totally fine. 
bowl of authentic gazpacho angaluz
The finished product.

An Authentic Gazpacho Recipe from Spain You’re Sure to Love

When you’re looking for a meal without having to turn on the oven, this authentic Gazpacho recipe is sure to excite you. It’s a simple way to curb your appetite, especially when you’re hot, tired, and don’t want to cook.

All you need to do is cut up tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, and bread. Throw in a little olive oil, sherry vinegar, salt and pepper to taste. Blend it all up and pour it out.

It’s that simple. You might lose yourself for a moment and think you’re surrounded by beautiful white buildings and wandering through a pueblo in Southern Spain.

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